Preventing salmonella infection in your own kitchen

Salmonella infection is considered one of the most common causes of food poisoning in the country. There are many types of salmonella bacteria, and salmonella contamination usually occurs more often during summer than in any other seasons. Although salmonella infection could be less serious for healthy individuals, those in vulnerable groups may develop complications that can be life-threatening.

Infants, children and older adults are more prone to develop severe symptoms. Pregnant women, those with weak immune system, and those who are under immunosuppressant medications may also develop serious complications. Due to its seriousness, it is important that people should be mindful if the food they are consuming is contaminated with potentially possibly deadly salmonella bacteria.

According to the website of the Cazayoux Ewing Law Firm, salmonella infection could be a result of defectively manufactured food products released in the market. A food that has been mishandled during the processing, packaging, and delivery could pose threat of contamination.

Another possible cause of salmonella infection is unsanitary food handling. Lawyers from the Abel Firm say on their website that restaurant owners and staff who are negligent of the salmonella threat could pose risk of contamination to their customers.

Foods prepared at home are also not safe from salmonella contamination. So, to prevent salmonellosis (salmonella disease) in your own kitchen, always remember these safety tips:

  • Meat products should be washed thoroughly. Salmonella bacteria breeds in animal intestine and feces, and a meat that hasn’t been washed carefully might carry the pathogen.
  • Wash vegetables well, especially if they will be eaten raw.
  • Do not let salmonella bacteria hitchhike on your dirty utensils. To avoid cross-contamination, wash knives, chopping boards, and other utensils in between use while cooking.
  • Raw meats and undercooked eggs can be good salmonella carriers. Remember to cook them well before serving.
  • Finally, utensils used for raw food items should NEVER be used for cooked and ready-to-eat foods to avoid contamination.

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